Holy Week in the Orthodox Church


Lazarus Saturday

On the Saturday before Holy Week, the Orthodox Church commemorates a major feast of the year, the miracle of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ when he raised Lazarus from the dead after he had lain in the grave four days. Here, at the end of Great Lent and the forty days of fasting and penitence, the Church combines this celebration with that of Palm Sunday. In triumph and joy the Church bears witness to the power of Christ over death and exalts Him as King before entering the most solemn week of the year, one that leads the faithful in remembrance of His suffering and death and concludes with the great and glorious Feast of Pascha. Read More

Palm Sunday: The Entrance of Christ into Jerusalem

On the Sunday before the Feast of Great and Holy Pascha and at the beginning of Holy Week, the Orthodox Church celebrates one of its most joyous feasts of the year. Palm Sunday is the commemoration of the Entrance of our Lord into Jerusalem following His glorious miracle of raising Lazarus from the dead. Having anticipated His arrival and having heard of the miracle, the people went out to meet the Lord and welcomed Him with displays of honor and shouts of praise. On this day, we receive and worship Christ in this same manner, acknowledging Him as our King and Lord. Read More

Services of the Bridegroom

Beginning on the evening of Palm Sunday and continuing through the evening of Holy Tuesday, the Orthodox Church observes a special service known as the Service of the Bridegroom. Each evening service is the Matins or Orthros service of the following day (e.g. the service held on Sunday evening is the Orthros service for Holy Monday). The name of the service is from the figure of the Bridegroom in the parable of the Ten Virgins found in Matthew 25:1-13. Read More

The Sacrament of Holy Unction

On the afternoon or evening of Great and Holy Wednesday, the Sacrament or Mystery of Holy Unction is conducted in Orthodox parishes. The Sacrament of Holy Unction is offered for the healing of soul and body and for forgiveness of sins. At the conclusion of the service of the Sacrament, the body is anointed with oil, and the grace of God, which heals infirmities of soul and body, is called down upon each person. The Sacrament is performed by a gathering of priests, ideally seven in number, however, it can be performed by a lesser number and even by a single priest. Read More

Great and Holy Thursday

On Thursday of Holy Week four events are commemorated: the washing of the disciples’ feet, the institution of the Sacrament of the Holy Eucharist at the Last Supper, the agony in the garden of Gethsemane, and the betrayal of Christ by Judas. Read More

Great and Holy Friday

On Great and Holy Friday the Orthodox Church commemorates the death of Christ on the Cross. This is the culmination of the observance of His Passion by which our Lord suffered and died for our sins. This commemoration begins on Thursday evening with the Matins of Holy Friday and concludes with a Vespers on Friday afternoon that observes the unnailing of Christ from the Cross and the placement of His body in the tomb. Read More

Holy Saturday

On Great and Holy Saturday the Orthodox Church commemorates the burial of Christ and His descent into Hades. It is the day between the Crucifixion of our Lord and His glorious Resurrection. The Matins of Holy Saturday is conducted on Friday evening, and while many elements of the service represent mourning at the death and burial of Christ, the service itself is one of watchful expectation. Read More

**Article referenced from www.goarch.org

AGOC Part of the East Side Community

Virgin Mary and Christ Child icon
Theotokos and Christ Child

Assumption Greek Orthodox Church is a small but thriving church near the center of Madison, located at 11 N. 7th Street, on the corner facing East Washington Avenue.  Today, our church is, in reality a multi-ethnic community which proudly includes many traditionally Eastern Orthodox peoples and their traditions. These groups may include Russians, Serbs, Ukranians, Armenians, Romanians, Croatians, and Arabs. It is a close-knit community that is growing as many people in the Madison discover its rich history and moving services and contributing ministries.

We invite you to come see our Church. The beautiful tradition of the Divine Liturgy, the icons that make the building a priceless work of art, the soaring angelic voices of the choir, the warm and hospitable people, will all welcome you with open arms to a truly holy experience.

If you are unfamiliar with Orthodox Christianity, here is a little background information.

The Orthodox Church has her origin with Jesus Christ and the Holy Spirit, not with a human teacher, or group, nor a code of conduct or religious philosophy. Orthodoxy believes that the Church has her origin in the Apostolic Community called into being by Jesus Christ, and enlivened by the Holy Spirit. The Feast of Pentecost, which is celebrated fifty days after Easter, commemorates the “outpouring” of the Holy Spirit upon the Apostles and marks the beginning of the mission of the Church to the world.

We are Orthodox because our tradition of prayer and worship is rooted in the One, Holy, Catholic, and Apostolic undivided Church.

The Orthodox Church was founded by Christ through the Apostles and has maintained a living, historical connection with the Apostolic Church through the ordination of its clergy. The bishop that ordains an Orthodox priest today can trace his ordination historically all the way back to the Apostles, and through them to Christ. For this reason we are “apostolic” – rooted in the first Apostles – the disciples of Jesus.

We are also apostolic because we believe our calling is to go out and share our faith with others. For this reason, we welcome you to visit the Orthodox Christian parish in your neighborhood or town.

Although our parishes may carry a designation of Greek Orthodox or Russian Orthodox or some other ethnic identity, this does not imply that you need to be of a certain ethnic origin to join us in worship or to consider becoming an Orthodox Christian.

Article from Greek Orthodox Diocese of America

Orthodox Marketplace Merchandise

Archbishop Demetrios Asks Faithful to Pray for the Victims of NYC Terrorist Attack

Read more here.

Orthodox Priest’s Vestments Dressed for Glory

daily readings app 
Get the Daily Reading APP

The Daily Readings App on your mobile device is the easiest way to access the day’s Bible readings prescribed by the Lectionary of the Greek Orthodox Church. The Daily Readings App also lets you read the lives of the saints or lookup fasting guidelines for each day right on your device.

Developed by the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese Department of Internet Ministries, there is no better way to carry the Church’s prescribed Scripture and devotional reading with you at all times. The Daily Readings App follows the typicon and lectionary of the Ecumenical Patriarchate.

Available Platforms:

A Visit to The Holy Mountain ATHOS, Greece

10 Fun Facts About the Orthodox Church

The Reconstruction of St. Nicholas Church and Shrine